Religio Romana
A new stone carving has been discovered at Arbeia Roman fort, at South Shields at the eastern end of Hadrian’s Wall.

The small but well-carved head is broken at the neck, suggesting it came from a statuette depicting a full figure. Above the benignly smiling face sits a mural crown - representing the towers of a city or fortress.

The mural crown marks the deity out as a Tyche - the protective personification of a place. In this instance, it is believed that the deity represents Brigantia, the personified protective goddess of the Romano-British tribe of the same name, whose lands covered large swathes of northern England.

The head came from a part of the fort changed when it was expanded in the early 3rd Century, suggesting that the shrine site might have been redundant by that time.  In 1895 an altar dedicated to Brigantia was also found at the fort.

A new stone carving has been discovered at Arbeia Roman fort, at South Shields at the eastern end of Hadrian’s Wall.

The small but well-carved head is broken at the neck, suggesting it came from a statuette depicting a full figure. Above the benignly smiling face sits a mural crown - representing the towers of a city or fortress.

The mural crown marks the deity out as a Tyche - the protective personification of a place. In this instance, it is believed that the deity represents Brigantia, the personified protective goddess of the Romano-British tribe of the same name, whose lands covered large swathes of northern England.

The head came from a part of the fort changed when it was expanded in the early 3rd Century, suggesting that the shrine site might have been redundant by that time. In 1895 an altar dedicated to Brigantia was also found at the fort.

A copper alloy figurine of a female figure, veiled as if ready to perform a sacrifice and holding a patera.  The figure might represent a priestess.

Found at Arbeia Roman fort and in the collections of the Great North Museum

A copper alloy figurine of a female figure, veiled as if ready to perform a sacrifice and holding a patera. The figure might represent a priestess.

Found at Arbeia Roman fort and in the collections of the Great North Museum

Hydria with scene from a story of Dionysus (Bacchus). While travelling to Greece by sea, pirates overtook Dionysus’ ship. They repeatedly tied him up but the ropes wouldn’t fasten. Dionysus then began to cover the ship with vines. In their desperation to escape the pirates leaped into the sea, turning into dolphins as they did so.

On this hydria, Dionysus is represented by the vines on the left of the scene.

Hydria with scene from a story of Dionysus (Bacchus). While travelling to Greece by sea, pirates overtook Dionysus’ ship. They repeatedly tied him up but the ropes wouldn’t fasten. Dionysus then began to cover the ship with vines. In their desperation to escape the pirates leaped into the sea, turning into dolphins as they did so.

On this hydria, Dionysus is represented by the vines on the left of the scene.

mini-girlz:

Bronze Venus
Statuette of the goddess nude, wearing a crown and jewels
Roman
1st century CE. 
via > vroma.org

mini-girlz:

Bronze Venus

Statuette of the goddess nude, wearing a crown and jewels

Roman

1st century CE. 

via > vroma.org

ancientart:

The Roman Temple of Portunus, Rome, Italy, 1st century B.C.E.

The year 221 B.C.E. was a turning point both for Rome and for Roman art. Breaking with precedent, Marcellus, conqueror of the fabulously wealthy Sicilian Greek city of Syracuse, brought back to Rome not only the usual spoils of war -captured arms and armor, gold and silver coins, and the like- but also the city’s artistic patrimony. Thus began, in the words of the historian Livy, “the craze for works of Greek art.” […] Nevertheless, although the Romans developed a virtually insatiable taste for Greek “antiques,” the Etruscan basis of Roman art and architecture was never forgotten. The buildings and statues of the Roman Republic are highly eclectic, drawing on both Greek and Etruscan traditions.
Eclecticism is the primary characteristic of the Republican temple on the east bank of the Tiber popularly known as the Temple of the Fortuna Virilis. It is actually a temple dedicated to Portunus, the Roman god of harbors. Its plan follows the Etruscan pattern with a high podium and a flight of steps only at the front. Freestanding columns are confined to the deep porch. But the structure is built of stone (local tufa and travertine), overlaid originally with stucco in imitation of Greek marble.
The columns are not Tuscan but Ionic, complete with flutes and bases, and there is a matching Ionic freeze. Moreover, in an effort to approximate a peripteral Greek temple yet maintain the basic Etruscan plan, the architect added a series of engaged Ionic half columns to the sides and back of the cella. The result was a pseudoperipteral temple. Although the design combines Etruscan and Greek elements, the resultant mix is uniquely Roman.
-Gardner’s Art Through the Ages, Enhanced Edition, Volume I.

Photo courtesy & taken by Darkroom Daze.

ancientart:

The Roman Temple of Portunus, Rome, Italy, 1st century B.C.E.

The year 221 B.C.E. was a turning point both for Rome and for Roman art. Breaking with precedent, Marcellus, conqueror of the fabulously wealthy Sicilian Greek city of Syracuse, brought back to Rome not only the usual spoils of war -captured arms and armor, gold and silver coins, and the like- but also the city’s artistic patrimony. Thus began, in the words of the historian Livy, “the craze for works of Greek art.” […] Nevertheless, although the Romans developed a virtually insatiable taste for Greek “antiques,” the Etruscan basis of Roman art and architecture was never forgotten. The buildings and statues of the Roman Republic are highly eclectic, drawing on both Greek and Etruscan traditions.

Eclecticism is the primary characteristic of the Republican temple on the east bank of the Tiber popularly known as the Temple of the Fortuna Virilis. It is actually a temple dedicated to Portunus, the Roman god of harbors. Its plan follows the Etruscan pattern with a high podium and a flight of steps only at the front. Freestanding columns are confined to the deep porch. But the structure is built of stone (local tufa and travertine), overlaid originally with stucco in imitation of Greek marble.

The columns are not Tuscan but Ionic, complete with flutes and bases, and there is a matching Ionic freeze. Moreover, in an effort to approximate a peripteral Greek temple yet maintain the basic Etruscan plan, the architect added a series of engaged Ionic half columns to the sides and back of the cella. The result was a pseudoperipteral temple. Although the design combines Etruscan and Greek elements, the resultant mix is uniquely Roman.

-Gardner’s Art Through the Ages, Enhanced Edition, Volume I.

Photo courtesy & taken by Darkroom Daze.

Archaeologists from the University of Münster excavating the ancient sanctuary of Jupiter Dolichenus near the town of Dülük in southern Turkey have unearthed more than 600 stamp and cylinder seals dating from between the 7th and the 4th centuries B.C.

rosebiar:

Visit metmuseum.org ~ Gold ring with carnelian intaglio: winged Nemesis. Imperial Period. 1st–early 3rd century A.D. Culture: Roman, Cypriot Medium: Carnelian, gold

rosebiar:

Visit metmuseum.org ~ Gold ring with carnelian intaglio: winged Nemesis. Imperial Period. 1st–early 3rd century A.D. Culture: Roman, Cypriot Medium: Carnelian, gold